Christophe Galtier led Lille to the title but he has stalled at Nice

Nice were meant to challenge PSG under Galtier, but he is short of ideas and they are falling down the table

By Adam White for Get French Football News

“It’s too early to say,” was supposedly Chinese leader Zhou Enlai’s response when asked in 1972 if the French revolution, which had occurred 200 years earlier, had been a success. The story is probably apocryphal, with Zhou most likely referring to the French student protests of the late 1960s, but long-term thinkers would offer a similar response now if asked to analyse Lille’s footballing revolution following their shock title win last season under the previously uninspiring Christophe Galtier. His current club, Nice, were expected to push for the title this season, but they have dropped out of Ligue 1’s European places this week, suggesting his revolution may be short lived.

Galter’s newfound managerial aura benefits from strong recency bias. After a decade as an assistant at clubs including Portsmouth, Al-Ain, Aris Soloniki and Lyon, he ascended to his first managerial role at struggling St Étienne in December 2009. Galtier kept the club up and kept his job. Over the next eight seasons, St Étienne became regulars in Europe and even won the Coupe de la Ligue in 2013 but, with their resources and quality dwindling, they soon plateaued.

Continue reading…Nice were meant to challenge PSG under Galtier, but he is short of ideas and they are falling down the tableBy Adam White for Get French Football News“It’s too early to say,” was supposedly Chinese leader Zhou Enlai’s response when asked in 1972 if the French revolution, which had occurred 200 years earlier, had been a success. The story is probably apocryphal, with Zhou most likely referring to the French student protests of the late 1960s, but long-term thinkers would offer a similar response now if asked to analyse Lille’s footballing revolution following their shock title win last season under the previously uninspiring Christophe Galtier. His current club, Nice, were expected to push for the title this season, but they have dropped out of Ligue 1’s European places this week, suggesting his revolution may be short lived.Galter’s newfound managerial aura benefits from strong recency bias. After a decade as an assistant at clubs including Portsmouth, Al-Ain, Aris Soloniki and Lyon, he ascended to his first managerial role at struggling St Étienne in December 2009. Galtier kept the club up and kept his job. Over the next eight seasons, St Étienne became regulars in Europe and even won the Coupe de la Ligue in 2013 but, with their resources and quality dwindling, they soon plateaued. Continue reading…Read MoreFootball | The Guardian

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